Allison Ishman: Fascia Therapy-Convertible

Allison Ishman: Fascia Therapy-Convertible

Allison Ishman: Fascia Therapy-Convertible

Hi, I’m Allison Ishman. I’m here at Oakworks today, demonstrating fascial link therapy, which is fascial neuromuscular therapy. We’re working today on the Oakworks ProLuxe Convertible, which is a great new product that allows us to turn our portable tables into lift tables. So you can take your portable table, just about any portable table, and put it on top of this wonderful lift mechanism. It really gives you the chance to save your back and shoulders. So we’re going to start off, if you’ll come on in here, and we’re gonna put your head down here. Now for your clients who are having a hard time getting on and off the table, it is very convenient to be able to set it even lower. It goes very low. And as they’re settled and they’re comfortable, you can begin to bring them up. I’m going to give this to you for your knees. We’re going to use an Oakworks Air Bolster. It’s an 8 inch bolster which gives us quite a bit of support for the knees. It takes a lot of pressure off of the lumbar spine, for those who may be experiencing discomfort in their lumbar spine. We’re looking to work superficial to deep through fascia. We’re dealing with compensating structures at the same time we’re dealing with painful structures. We’re working through fascial layers and right now we’re going to work with the flexor retnaculum, located at the ankle, it actually shows both on the lateral and the medial aspect of the ankle, attaches to the calcaneus. We’re going to link this area with the iliotibial band. The iliotibial band…I’m just going to go a little lower… originates on the pelvis, at the iliac crest and comes down, it tends to wrap into this greater trocanter of the femur and comes down the leg, attaching below the knee. So we’re going to apply our techniques in those areas. I’m actually going to cross the body, just for convenience, so we’re going to start here. We’re working from the foundation up, which is a good basic technique to learn. It starts right near the feet. We’re going to warm the area a little, so I’m going to use a little pressure. I’m going to try to assess the thickness and tone of the tissue while I’m compressing it to warm it up. And then we’re going to check with our client. Certainly when you’re first learning is a good time to really spend some time talking to your client. On a scale of one to five, how sore is that? About a three. About a three? Ok. And then I’m just going to cross the body. I’m going to look for similar fascial structures up here. So I’m just going to use a little compression with my hands. I’m actually going to lower it. It is convenient. I’m just doing a little compression with my hand and I’m looking for fiber bundles. Through the iliotibial band, you’ll often find differences in thickness and tone closer to the knee.  And it may change as you hit the center fibers. And then as you go more superior on the anterior fibers, you’ll find a change in tone sometimes again. She’s wearing these pants, which convenienty allow us to separate midlle fibers, They’re in the white area. And then, posterior fibers closer to the hamstring. Just relax your leg for me. I’m not hurting you am I? No. Ok. And we just compressing, we’re checking for thickness. We’re warming and reducing any waste that we can from compressions, bringing in some blood flow. So, comparable, this is pretty tight stuff up in here. On a one to five is that about a three? Yeah, so we’re going to apply a dual release technique. We’re going to work in two areas that are compensating areas. The hips and the ankles tend to be compensating areas, so we’re going to work with the flexor retnaculum, down here at the heel. We’re looking for about that three level. Would you call that a three? And now I’m just going to reach across, I’m going to stabilize my body mechanics up against the table and provide some pressure. How about that? About right? And the client should feel a sense of release in that release point one, the first area we worked with, by holding release point two. And then it generally takes between ten and fifteen seconds to feel a release with the dual release technique. So I can check with her about now. Is it clear? Ok. And then we’ll come back down to this area, and I’m just going to put about the same pressure. Is that about the same pressure? Uh huh. And is it sore? No. So it’s fast work. You should get results in a fairly short period of time and then you should be able to move on other structures. If you’re interested in more information fascial link therapy, you can visit us online at ibodycare.com. There you can find class information and a fascial link therapy book. Thanks for your time and thanks for joining us at Oakworks. Allison Ishman.

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